Category Archives: Essential Depot Products

Cocoa Butter

Cocoa Butter

Latin Name: theobroma cacao
Forms Available: butter

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Cocoa butter is the fat which is obtained by hydraulic pressing of cocoa nib or cocoa mass obtained from the cocoa beans. It could be filtered or centrifuged. This is an all natural process and no solvents are used. It is used in balms lotions, creams, and soaps because of cocoa butter’s softening and skin-healing properties. Most lip balms and massage butters require cocoa butter for firmness. It’s the perfect oil for massaging daily into fast-growing pregnant bellies to prevent stretch marks from developing.

 

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In soapmaking, cocoa butter should be used along with more easily absorbed unsaturated oils such as olive, jojoba, castor, or avocado. A soap made with too high a percentage of cocoa butter will be hard and prone to cracking. Limit cocoa butter to around 15% of your total fats and oils. Use it to counterbalance the stickiness of certain fats such as shea butter.

Cocobutte-broucher
Visit AyurvedicOils.com for more information on the traditional ayurvedic and aromatherapeutic uses of Cocoa Butter.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: The perfect oil for massaging daily into fast-growing pregnant bellies to prevent stretch marks from developing.

Thought for the day:

Seeds and nuts are indispensable for cardiovascular health. The protective properties of nuts against coronary heart disease were first recognized in the early 1990s, and a strong body of literature has followed, confirming these original findings.
-Joel Fuhrman.

Suggested Reading:

  1. The Miracle of Nuts, Seeds and Grains: The Scientific Facts about Nutritional Properties and Medicinal Values of Nuts, Seeds and Grains by Dr. Bahram Tadayyon
  2. Theobroma Cacao, Or Cocoa: Its Botany, Cultivation, Chemistry And Diseases by Herbert Wright
  3. Superfoods for Life, Cacao: – Improve Heart Health – Boost Your Brain Power – Decrease Stress Hormones and Chronic Fatigue – 75 Delicious Recipes – by Matthew Ruscigno
  4. The World and Africa: An Inquiry into the Part Which Africa Has Played in World by W. E. B Du Bois
  5. The Chocolate-Plant (Theobroma Cacao) and Its Products by Walter Baker and Company

Reference Links:

  1. Cocoa butter by Wikipedia
  2. Cocoa Bioactive Compounds: Significance and Potential for the Maintenance of Skin Health published in Nutrients and PubMed
  3. Theobroma Cacao: A Taste of the Fountain of Youth by Keoni Teta and Jillian Sarno Teta published in the online community of All Things Healing
  4. Physical and Chemical information on Cocoa beans, butter, mass and powder by the International Cocoa Organization
  5. Cocoa and chocolate flavonoids: implications for cardiovascular health by Steinberg FM, Bearden MM, Keen CL, Department of Nutrition, University of California, published in the Journal of American Dietetic Association

    Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil

Latin Name: cocos nucifera
Forms Available: oil

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Coconut oil is obtained from copra, the dried “meat” of coconut. Distillers separate the copra from the hull of the coconut. It is dried, crushed, and then expressed to remove the oil.

This coconut becomes liquid at 76 degrees.  When cold, it becomes solid or semi-solid.  This oil has a thick texture with no taste and no odor.  A percentage of coconut oil in cosmetics is moisturizing; too much of it can be drying.  Its saturated nature resists rancidity and makes a very hard soap, while at the same time producing a fluffy lather.

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Soapmakers usually combine coconut oil with olive, palm, palm kernel or castor oils for an all-vegetable soap.  Some soapmakers use between 20% and 30% of a soap batch as coconut oil.

Coconut Oil contains beneficial lauric acid, which may be of particular benefit for immune-suppressed individuals.  It is more heat stable than other plant based oils and does not create trans fatty acids when cooked at higher temperatures.  Use for all higher heat applications, including stir frying – Maximum temperature of 375F or 190C.  Excellent for baking, can be substituted for butter in most recipes.  Use in blender drinks to add fuel and energy in the morning.

Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Clove Bud Essential Oil

Latin Name: syzgium aromaticum

Forms Available: essential oil, ground, whole, leaf, flower, bud

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Clove Bud Essential Oil is derived from the slender evergreen that grows up to 12 meters in height (approximately 36 feet). At the start of the rainy season, long buds appear that change color over time and are beaten from the trees and dried. These are the cloves sold that are sold commercially. The word ‘clove’ comes from the Latin word clavus, meaning nail, because the shaft and head of the clove bud resembled an ancient nail. Cloves were among the most precious of spices of Europe during the 16th and 17th centuries, and were worth more than their weight in gold. They continue to be used in Ayurvedic medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, western herbalism, and in dentistry.

Cloves have a strong spiciness that flavors foods and prevents nausea. The flowers are used to soothe aching eyes. Clove oil, from the distillation of leaves and flower buds, is an antiseptic numbing agent for toothache and indigestion. It is added to cosmetics, perfumes, and cigarettes.

Clove-oil-bud-broucher
Visit AyurvedicOils.com for more information on the traditional ayurvedic and aromatherapeutic uses of Clove Bud Oil. Learn about the natural chemical components that give Clove Bud Oil its fragrance and therapeutic characteristics.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Nausea; Flatulence; Asthma; Bronchitis; Arthritis; Rheumatism; Toothache; Diarrhea; Infections; as an Analgesic and Antiseptic; Insect Repellent. Key Qualities: Tonic; Stimulating; Revitalizing; Aphrodisiac; Warming; Comforting; Purifying; Active.

Other Uses: Use for:  Divination; Love; Lust; Banishing; Releasing; Inspiration; Wisdom. Burn for Wealth; Purification; to ward negative thoughts; or to stop others from gossiping about you.

Thought for the day:

And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. – Anais Nin

Suggested Reading:

  1. Clove Oil! Discover The Essential Oil Of Cloves Health Benefits For Toothaches, Acne, Hair & Much More: A Book On Clove Oil Secrets (Natural Health Books Series) by Tina Cody
  2. Scents Of Life: Use And Effect Of Essential Oils by H. M. Schemske
  3. The Modern Ayurveda: Milestones Beyond the Classical Age from CRC Press
  4. Ayurveda & Aromatherapy: The Earth Essential Guide to Ancient Wisdom and Modern Healing by Dr. Light Miller, Dr. Bryan Miller
  5. The Fragrant Mind: Aromatherapy for Personality, Mind, Mood and Emotion by Valerie Ann Worwood

Reference Links:

  1. Clove by Wikipedia
  2. Health Benefits of Clove Oil by Organic Facts
  3. Cloves and Clove oil by Healing Naturally by Bee
  4. The Health Benefits of Cloves by The Global Healing Center
  5. Traditional Uses of Clove by Natural Standard, The Authority on Integrative Medicine
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Fir Needle

Fir Needle

Latin Name: abies alba
Alternative Name: birth tree, silver fir
Forms Available: essential oil, leaf, bark, wood, seed, sap

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Fir Needle oil is extracted from the needle like leaves of Silver fir tree, scientifically known as Abies Alba, also known as Birth Tree.  A Druid sacred tree, the Silver Fir grows to a height of 180 feet.  This was the original Christmas tree from central Europe, chosen for its long lasting, aromatic needles.  The bark resin is distilled to make Strassburg turpentine.  The buds and leaves are distilled to make the expectorant and antiseptic Silver Pine needle oil, which is used in cough drops and asthma inhalations, and to give pine scent to toiletries.

Buy Fir Needle Essential Oil – CLICK HERE

fit-needle
Visit AyurvedicOils.com for more information on the traditional ayurvedic and aromatherapeutic uses of Fir Needle Oil. Learn about the natural chemical components that give Fir Needle Oil its fragrance and therapeutic characteristics.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: The buds and leaves are distilled to make the expectorant and antiseptic Silver Pine needle oil, which is used in cough drops and asthma inhalations.

Other Uses:  The needles are burned at childbirth to bless and protect the mother and baby.  Burn for Happiness; Harmony; Peace; Inspiration; and Wisdom.

Thought for the day:

Nature’s music is never over; her silences are pauses, not conclusions.   -Mary Webb

Suggested Reading:

  1. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: The Complete Guide to the Use of Oils in Aromatherapy & Herbalism by Julia Lawless
  2. Healing Power Beyond Medicine by Carol A. Wilson
  3. The Book of Herbal Wisdom: Using Plants as Medicines by Matthew Wood
  4. Aromatherapy for the Soul: Healing the Spirit with Fragrance and Essential Oils by Valerie Ann Worwood
  5. Genetics and breeding of the Silver Fir (Abies alba Mill.) =: Genetika i oplemenjivanje obicne jele (Abies alba Mill.) (Anali za sumarstvo) by Stefan Korpel

Reference Links:

  1. Abies Alba by Wikipedia
  2. Abies Balsamea by The University of Michigan
  3. Composition and antibacterial activity of Abies Balsamea essential oil by Pichette A, Larouche PL, Lebrun M, Legault J. Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Canada, published in PubMed
  4. Balsam Fir by herbs2000.com
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Juniper

Juniper

Latin Name: juniperus communis
Alternative Name: enegro, gemeiner wachholder, geneva, gin berry, ginepro, gin plant.
Forms Available: essential oil, berry, twig

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Juniper – juniperus communis – A Druid sacred tree, Juniper is an evergreen tree or shrub with needle-like leaves in threes and berrylike cones that ripen to blue-black in their second or third year.
Primarily a diuretic, the berries help digestive problems, gastrointestinal inflammations, and rheumatism. The berries are taken as a tea -simmer two teaspoons per cup of water for ten minutes; take up to one cup four times a day, or taken as jam or syrup in water, mild, or herb tea. The dry berries can be chewed; three a day is sufficient.

Buy Juniper Berry Essential Oil – CLICK HERE

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Acne; Dermatitis; Eczema; Hair Loss; Hemorrhoids; Wounds; Tonic for Oily Complexions; Accumulation of Toxins. Key Qualities: Aphrodisiac; Purifying; Clearing; Depurative; Nerve Tonic; Reviving; Protective; Restorative.

Other Uses: Probably one of the earliest incenses used by Mediterranean Witches. Its berries were used with thyme in Druid and grove incenses for visions. Juniper grown by the door discourages thieves. The mature berries can be strung in the house to attract love.

Thought for the day:

The trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit. – By Moliere

Suggested Reading:

  1. Vibrational Healing: Revealing the Essence of Nature through Aromatherapy and Essential Oils by Deborah Eidson
  2. Ayurvedic Remedies- For the Whole Family by Light Miller
  3. Essential Oils for Weight Loss: Easy Ways to Supercharge your Weight Loss Success with Essential Oils by Isla Burroughs
  4. Herbs for Detoxification by C.J. Puotinen

Reference Links:

  1. Juniper Berry by Wikipedia
  2. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of juniper berry oil and its selected components by Natalia Filipowicz, Marcin Kamiński, Julianna Kurlenda, Monika Asztemborska and J. Renata Ochocka, published in Phytotherapy research
  3. Health benefits of Juniper essential oil by Organic Facts
  4. Ayurvedic Remedies: For The Whole Family, by Light Miller
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Lavender

Lavender

Latin Name: lavandula. lavendula officinalis
Alternative Name: elf leaf, nard, nardus, spike.
Forms Available: essential oil, absolute, bud, powder, flower

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The Lavender plant grows to about one meter in height and produces long thin purple- blue flowers. The entire plant is covered with oil glands, which are in the star shaped hairs that cover the plant. Lavender has been used since ancient times, and the Romans added lavender to their bath water, hence the name from the Latin lavare, ‘to wash’.

Indigenous to the mountainous regions of the Mediterranean areas, Lavender is also grown throughout the world including the United States, Australia, Southern Europe, France, India and other parts of Asia.

Lavender and Lavender essential oil have roots deeply vested in the historic healing of human beings.  For more than 2500 years, Lavender has been used for therapeutic, culinary and beauty benefits in the cosmetic and personal hygiene industry.

Lavender – lavandula spp. – There are 28 species of these aromatic, evergreen, shrubby, perennials, all with small, linear leaves and spikes of fragrant, usually purple or blue, two-lipped flowers. Aromatic oil glands cover all aerial parts of the plants but are most concentrated in the flowers. The flowers flavor jams, vinegar, sweets, cream, and Provençal stews, and are crystallized for decoration. Dried flowers add long-lasting fragrance to sachets and potpourri. Flower water is a skin toner useful for speeding cell renewal and is an antiseptic for acne. Flower tea treats anxiety, headaches, flatulence, nausea, dizziness, and halitosis.

The essential oil is a highly valued perfume and healer. It is antiseptic, mildly sedative, and painkilling. It is applied to insect bites, and treats burns, sore throats and headaches. Queen Elizabeth I is said to have consumed up to 10 cups of lavender water a day to relieve migraines.

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The oil is used for intestinal gas, migraine, and dizziness. Being antiseptic, lavender is added to healing salves. A tea of the leaf allays nausea and vomiting. Use two teaspoons per cup of water and steep for twenty minutes. The dose is one-fourth cup four times a day. Steep lavender blossoms in white wine and strain to make a natural antidepressant beverage. Lavender and rose petal vinagar is applied to the temples and brow to ease headache. Lavender oil is added to footbaths, eases toothaches and sprains, and is used as a rub for hysteria and palsy.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Abscess; Acne; Allergies; Athlete’s Foot; Boils; Bruises; Burns; Dermatitis; Eczema; Inflammation; Insect Bites. Key Qualities: Soothing; Sedative; Antidepressant; Calming; Relaxing; Balancing; Restorative; Cephalic; Appeasing; Cleansing; Purifying.

Lavender-broucher
Visit AyurvedicOils.com for more information on the traditional ayurvedic and aromatherapeutic uses of Lavender Oil. Learn about the natural chemical components that give Lavender Oil its fragrance and therapeutic characteristics.

Other Uses: Lavender is strewn into bonfires at Midsummer as an offering to the Gods and Goddesses. An ingredient of love spells, its scent is said to attract men. Lavender in the home brings peace, joy and healing. The essential oil is included in health and love.

Thought for the day:

                      Come forth into the light of things, let Nature be your teacher. -by William Wordsworth

Suggested reading:

  1. Lovely Lavender: The Many Applications and Uses of Lavender Essential Oil (Essential Oils and Aromatherapy) by Rashelle Johnson
  2. Lavender Oil: The New Guide to Nature’s Most Versatile Remedy by Julia Lawless
  3. The Magic and Power of Lavender: The Secret of the Blue Flower, It’s Fragrance and Practical Application in Health Care and Cosmetics by Maggie Tisserand, Monika Junemann
  4. Lavender: Nature’s Way to Relaxation and Health by Philippa Waring
  5. HEALING POWERS OF LAVENDER Pure Essential Oil – The Universal Healer (The Aromatherapy Professional: Healing with Essential Oils) by KG Stiles

Reference Links:

  1. Lavender by University of Maryland Medical Center
  2. Pharmaco-physio-psychologic effect of Ayurvedic oil-dripping treatment using an essential oil from Lavendula angustifolia PubMed.gov
  3. Lavender: An Ayurvedic View by Gurukula Blog
  4. Chemical Composition of Lavender Essential Oil and its Antioxidant Activity and inhibition against rhinitis-related bacteria by Lu Hui, Li He, Lu Huan, Li XiaoLan and Zhou AiGuo published in the African Journal of Microbiology Research
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Geranium Essential Oil

Geranium Essential Oil – Possible Skin Issues:

Greener Life Diamond – Bio-Healthy Score => 3 – Possible Skin Issues.

Maximum dermal use level: 17.5%

The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) recommends that geraniol be limited to 5.3%, which translates into 17.5% Geranium oil (about 105 drops per ounce of any other carrier oils) for leave-on products like ointments, creams, and lotions. There is no restriction for body washes, shampoos, soaps, and other wash-off products because the oil does not remain on the skin.

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Geranium is a hairy perennial shrub, often used in hedgerows, and will stand up to about one meter high (3 feet) with pointed leaves, serrated at the edges and with flowers that range from red to a pinkish white. Geranium plants originated in South Africa, Madagascar, Egypt and Morocco and were introduced to European countries in the 17th century.  The petals are used in gourmet jellies and confections, and the oil is widely used in scented topical applications.

Geranium Essential Oil is steam distilled from leaf. Sweet, heavy aroma, somewhat like rose with a minty overtone.

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Geranium and its essential oil have been used in numerous alternative medicinal practices for healing wounds and fractures.  It is said that the ancient Greeks used Geranium for treating skin problems.  Egyptians used Geranium oil for enhancing the beauty and radiance of their skin.

This plant was grown around homes in the ancient times to keep away from evil spirits.  Traditionally,  Africans used Geranium oil in the treatment of cholera and tumors. Native American tribes in North America used Geranium tea prepared from the root powder to enhance the body’s immune power, and to treat ulcers and dysentery.

There are 250 natural species and thousands of cultivars and hybrid varieties of the Pelargonium plant family, in the genus Geraniaceae and the most popular ones are Egyptian Geranium, Reunion or the Geranium Bourbon and the Moroccan varieties. Most of the varieties have a similar structure of chemical constituents with Citronellol and Geraniol being the prevalent components.

Geranium Bourbon essential oil is certified with GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) status by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) as Geranium oil is mild and tested safe on individuals on a normal prescribed usage level.

Using Geranium oil in a concentrated form or beyond the safe level of use might cause adverse skin reactions like mild irritation, sensitization (lower risk), rashes, allergy, irritation of the eyes and contact dermatitis. Geranium oil is non-phototoxic in nature.

The primary chemical constituents that are held responsible for the adverse skin reactions of Geranium oil are citronellal and geraniol, where citronellal is reported to exhibit mild irritant effect along with sporadic sensitization and skin irritation and Geraniol is claimed for skin sensitization.

The safe dermal usage level for this oil is 17.5% by IFRA (International Fragrance Association) and this safety report is based on the 30% Geraniol content, which has a maximum dermal limit of 5.3%.

Research reports reveal the skin irritating effect of Reunion Geranium oil used in an undiluted manner; this oil was slightly irritating when tested on mouse skin; when tested with 5% Bourbon Geranium oil on 100 repeated dermatitis patients, the result was placid with two irritant reactions. It has also been proved that cosmetics with Geranium oil formula have caused dermatitis in hypersensitive individuals.

Always blend Geranium essential oil in carrier oils like Olive oil, Jojoba oil or Coconut oil before using it topically. This is because organic and pure essential oils are extremely concentrated liquid substances that may impair the skin surface, when used in an undiluted form.

Essential oils are recommended only for external use and never ingest essential oils as it can cause serious health hazards.  When administering Geranium oil orally in studies,  acute dermal LD50 has been witnessed  in rabbits. This may also cause possible drug interactions with antidiabetic medicines and the enzyme, CYP2B6 inhibiting effect of geraniol causes drug interaction metabolized by CYP2B6.

A recent study has witnessed this by testing alloxan-induced diabetic male rats with Geranium oil for about a month. The level of blood glucose was decreased by glibenclamide and the concentration of hepatic glycogen was significantly augmented.

As there are no evidenced reports on the safety of Geranium oil during pregnancy and lactating, it is safe to avoid this oil for it may have an impact on the hormonal fluctuations during these special moments. It is better to keep away Geranium oil from babies, either as a massage aid or for inhalation as it can harm their sensitive and tender skin.

http://ayurvedicoils.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Geranium-broucher.jpg
Visit AyurvedicOils.com for more information on the traditional ayurvedic and aromatherapeutic uses of Geranium Oil. Learn about the natural chemical components that give Geranium Oil its fragrance and therapeutic characteristics.

Among its reputed aromatherapeutic properties are analgesic, antidepressant, antiseptic, cicatrisant, diuretic and insecticide. Calms anxiety, lifts the spirit, assists with depression. Useful for all conditions of the woman’s reproductive system as an inhalant and massage application, beneficial for PMS. May assist with menopausal problems such as vaginal dryness and heavy periods. Assists with breast inflammation. Helps clear the body of toxins and this may be helpful with addictions. Stimulates the lymphatic system which keeps infection at bay. Eases neuralgia. Indicated for all problems of the nervous system such as anxiety and nervous fatigue. The oil is a diuretic and a lymphatic stimulant which can help relieve congestion, fluid retention and swollen ankles. Useful for all skin conditions as it balances sebum. Good for oily skin. It’s an excellent remedy for burns, wounds and ulcers. Blends well with basil, bergamot, carrot seed, jasmine, lavender and rose.

Reference Links Substantiating the Possible Skin Issues of Geranium Oil:

  1. Geranium by Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals By Robert Tisserand, Rodney Young
  2. Geranium Toxicology by Leung’s Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients, used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics by Ikhlas A. Khan and Ehab A. Abourashed
  3. Side effects of Geranium oil by Mercola.com
  4. Side effects and Safety of Geranium oil by WebMD

Thought for the day:

The course of Nature is the art of God. -Edward Young

Suggested Reading:

  1. How to Use Geranium Essential Oil (Aromatherapy) by Miriam Kinai
  2. Growing Pelargoniums and Geraniums: A Complete Guide by Beryl Stockton, Geoff Stockton, John Mason
  3. Geraniums: The Complete Encyclopedia by Faye Brawner
  4. Geranium and Pelargonium: History of Nomenclature, Usage and Cultivation (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants – Industrial Profiles) from CRC Press
  5. Ayurveda & Aromatherapy: The Earth Essential Guide to Ancient Wisdom and Modern Healing by Dr. Light Miller, Dr. Bryan Miller

Reference Links:

  1. Pelargonium graveolens by Wikipedia
  2. The Emotional, physical and health benefits of Geranium Essential Oil by HubPages
  3. Antibacterial activity and composition of essential oils from Pelargonium graveolens L’Her and Vitex agnus-castus L. by Ghannadi A, Bagherinejad M, Abedi D, Jalali M, Absalan B, Sadeghi N, published in PubMed
  4. Geranium by Daniele Ryman for the Aromatherapy Bible
  5. What are the benefits of Geranium oil in Aromatherapy by Yogawiz.com
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

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Pine Scotch Essential Oil

Pine Scotch Essential Oil – Possible Skin Issues:

Greener Life Diamond – Bio-Healthy Score => 3 – Possible Skin Issues:

Maximum dermal use level: 2%

While there are no regulatory restrictions on the use of Scots Pine oil, the oxidation products of alpha-pinene and delta-3-carene can cause skin sensitization. Pine oil should be stored in dark bottles and cool locations to avoid oxidation. The use of antioxidants in formulations containing pine oil is also advised.

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Originally from around the Mediterranean basin, this evergreen tree can grow up to 25 – 30 feet and the bark is a reddish-brown that is deeply fissured with needle-like leaves that grow in pairs, and pear-shaped cones. Historically it has been used in steam baths and massage oils.

Buy Pine Scotch Essential Oil – 4oz – CLICK HERE
Buy Pine Scotch Essential Oil – 1KG – CLICK HERE

The essential oil of Pine Scotch is said to cause mild skin irritation, contact dermatitis, sensitization, allergic reactions and irritation of the mucous membrane. It has been certified as GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) by the FEMA (Flavouring Extract Manufacturers’ Association). The chief chemical components responsible for the adverse skin impacts of Pine Scotch oil are α-pinene, delta-3-carene and limonene, mainly due to their autoxidation effects.

Certain studies report the effects of Pine scotch oil on contact dermatitis and sensitivity. When used in large doses α-pinene has the potential to cause irritation of the mucous membrane, kidney damage, CNS (Central Nervous System) depression, growth of benign tumors, skin sensitization, allergies and irritation.

According to the Food and Cosmetic Toxicology edition (1976) by L.J. Opdyke, Pine Scotch oil sensitizing and irritating to certain individuals and is nonphototoxic in nature. When tested on repeated dermatitis patients at 2%, this oil provoked allergic reactions in about 12 members of the 1606 tested.

As Pine scotch oil has the tendency to irritate the lining of the mucous membrane during inhalation, it is good to avoid this oil if you have asthma, allergies in the respiratory passages and bronchial disorders.

The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) claims Pine Scotch oil as a sensitizing oil. Pine Scotch oil is recommended only for dermal use and not for ingestion. Besides being proved as an effective cytotoxic agent (fights against cancerous cells), certain studies have witnessed the renal failure, genotoxic and acute toxicity effects of the ingestion of Pine scotch oil.

Never use Pine scotch oil in an undiluted form and make certain that you always blend essential oils with gentle carrier oils like coconut oil and olive oil, as organic essential oils are very concentrated and may cause negative effects on the eyes, skin and the body. Stay safe by using diluted Pine scotch oil and avoid using it on allergies, damaged skin, eyes and inflammatory skin conditions.

It is better to avoid the use of Pine scotch oil if you are pregnant or nursing as there is insufficient information on the safe use of this oil during these sensitive times when the system experience enormous changes in the hormonal functions.

These possible skin issues are applicable only for leave-on products like creams and lotions and not for rinse-off products like soaps, shampoos and other bath preparations.

pine-broucherThe traditional therapeutic values of Pine pinaster oil are anti-inflammatory, expectorant, restorative, stimulant, antiviral, antibacterial, circulatory, decongestant, disinfectant, analgesic and deodorant. The bark of this tree contains Oligomeric Proanthocyanidin Complexes (OPC’s) that make it an effective antioxidant that can fight against free radicals responsible for cancerous diseases.

Reference Links Substantiating the Possible Skin Issues of Pine Scotch Oil:

  1. Pine oil by Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals By Robert Tisserand, Rodney Young
  2. Pine side effects and safety by WebMD
  3. Pine Needle Oil Toxicology by Leung’s Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients, used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics by Ikhlas A. Khan and Ehab A. Abourashed
  4. Medicinal Plants in Australia Volume 2: Gums, Resins, Tannin and Essential Oils by Cheryll Williams
  5. Selectivity of Pinus sylvestris extract and essential oil to estrogen-insensitive breast cancer cells Pinus sylvestris against cancer cells by Nguyen Thi Hoai, Ho Viet Duc, Do Thi Thao, Anne Orav and Ain Raal, published in the Pharmacognosy Magazine
  6. Scotch Pine Needle Oil by The Good Scents Company
  7. Pinus Species by Adverse Effects of Herbal Drugs 2

Thought for the day:

Trees are the earth’s endless effort to speak to the listening heaven.
-Rabindranath Tagore

Suggested Reading:

  1. The Practice of Aromatherapy by Dr. Jean Valnet
  2. Ayurveda & Aromatherapy: The Earth Essential Guide to Ancient Wisdom and Modern Healing by Dr. Light Miller, Dr. Bryan Miller
  3. The Aromatherapy Companion: Medicinal Uses/Ayurvedic Healing/Body-Care Blends/Perfumes & Scents/Emotional Health & Well-Being (Herbal Body) by Victoria H. Edwards

Reference Links:

  1. Maritime Pine by Victoria Department of Environment and Primary Industries
  2. Chemical and Antimicrobial Properties of Essential Oils of Five Moroccan Pinaceae published in The Journal of Essential Oil Research
  3. Pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects of Pinus pinaster bark extract published in PubMed
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Lime Essential Oil

Lime Essential Oil Possible Skin Issues:

Greener Life Diamond – Bio-Healthy Score => 3 – Possible Skin Issues:

Maximum dermal use level: 0.7% to avoid phototoxicity

The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) recommends that Lime oil be limited to 0.7% (about 4 drops per ounce of any other carrier oils) for leave-on products like ointments, creams, and lotions used on skin exposed to sunlight. There is no restriction for body washes, shampoos, soaps, and other wash-off products because the oil does not remain on the skin.

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Lime is a small evergreen tree that produces a small, sour fruit very similar to Lemon. The fruits themselves are green in color with a fleshy interior. Historically, limes were used to prevent sailors from developing scurvy.

Lime is indigenous to Asia and is now cultivated in numerous countries like America, West Indies and Italy. This evergreen tree bears white flowers and glittering green fruits. India is the largest Lime oil producing country in the world and Lime was introduced into Europe initially by the Moors and was then spread slowly to America. Lime essential oil is extracted by cold press method from the peel of the fruit.

The leaves of the Lime tree were used in the prehistoric period for treating poisonous bites and swellings.  Apart from its medicinal uses, Lime has been used in making pickles, sauces, desserts, jams, confections, sorbets, marmalades, beverages, squashes, perfumes, household cleaners, detergents, soaps, cosmetics and other beauty products.

Buy Lime Essential Oil – 4oz – CLICK HERE
Buy Lime Essential Oil – 1KG – CLICK HERE

Lime essential oil has a photosensitizing effect that can cause irritation of the skin, allergic reactions, burning sensation, phytophotodermatitis, hyperpigmentation (change of skin color, visible especially in people with white skin complexion) and certain other effects. The photosensitizing effect can last up to 12 hours after application.

The primary chemical constituent responsible for the photo-carcinogenic, skin sensitizing and other topical effects of the essential oil of Lime is Limonene and certain other furanocoumarins.

A 2014 study published in the Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives reveals about a skin condition called as phytophotodermatitis, induced by Lime, where a 24-year old nurse came up with red demarcated tender patches and crusted vesicles after squeezing fresh limes and going out in sun on a bright day.

Phytophotodermatitis is defined as a nonimmunologic eruption of the skin that occurs after its contact with phototoxic components in certain plant varieties and is then exposed to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation through visible sunlight.

Few other studies also witness the effects of photosensitization of Lime and Lime-based products containing psoralens, paving the way for burns, blisters, bullae, eruption, erythematous vesicles, rashes, inflammation and hyperpigmentation. It is also been said that in certain severe cases, systemic toxicity come with the rashes, which includes nausea, vomiting and fever.

Lime oil has also been reported to promote tumors, when tested on rats where most of the papillomas were benign and few were malignant.

The safe dilution level of Lime oil is 0.7%, which is 4.2 drops per ounce of any carrier oils as per the International Fragrance Association (IFRA). This safe dilution level applies only for leave-on products like lotions and creams and is not applicable for wash-away products like soaps, shampoos and other bathing products.

IFRA also suggests that Limonene rich essential oils should only be employed, provided the level of peroxides are set aside to the lowest realistic level, for example: by including antioxidants during production.

Lime oil has ‘Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS)’status by FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). As per the European regulatory body, essential oils with furanocoumarins must be used in such a way that the level of bergapten should not go beyond 15ppm (parts per million) in ready to use cosmetic products after which the skin is subjected to exposure of direct sunlight and this does not apply for wash-off products. The level of bergapten should be 1 ppm in bronzing and sun protection products.

For your information, Furocoumarins are also used in healing practices on par with long-wave ultraviolet light therapy for treating vitiligo, psoriasis and mycosis fungoides.

Lime-broucher
Visit AyurvedicOils.com for more information on the traditional ayurvedic and aromatherapeutic uses of Lime Oil. Learn about the natural chemical components that give Lime Oil its fragrance and therapeutic characteristics.

Reference Links Substantiating the Possible Skin Issues of Lime Oil:

  1. Lime-induced Phytophotodermatitis by Dr. Andrew Hankinson, Dr. Benjamin Lloyd and Dr. Richard Alweis, published in the Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives and PubMed
  2. Citrus aurantifolia, American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook, Second Edition by Zoe Gardner, Michael McGuffin
  3. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals By Robert Tisserand, Rodney Young
  4. Leung’s Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients, used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics by Ikhlas A. Khan and Ehab A. Abourashed.
  5. Safety Information on Essential Oils by the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy
  6. Lime oil by Mercola.com
  7. A Topical Skin Eruption by Dr. Christina Greenaway, published in the Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and PubMed

Thought for the day:

It is written on the arched sky; it looks out from every star. It is the poetry of Nature; it is that which uplifts the spirit within us. -John Ruskin

Suggested Reading:

  1. Citrus Oils: Composition, Advanced Analytical Techniques, Contaminants, and Biological Activity (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants – Industrial Profiles) From CRC Press
  2. Ayurveda & Aromatherapy: The Earth Essential Guide to Ancient Wisdom and Modern Healing by Dr. Light Miller, Dr. Bryan Miller
  3. Growing Citrus: The Essential Gardener’s Guide by Martin Page
  4. Save Your Life with the Phenomenal Lemon (& Lime!) (Save Your Life!) by Blythe Ayne
  5. The Lemon & Lime Cookbook by Rick Donker
  6. Essential Oil Safety, Second Edition by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

Reference Links:

  1. Lime is Beneficial for Skin and Hair by Namini Wijedasa published in Infolanka.com
  2. Acne by the American Academy of Dermatology
  3. In vitro antibacterial activity of some plant essential oils by Seenivasan Prabuseenivasan, Manickkam Jayakumar, and Savarimuthu Ignacimuthupublished in BMC Complement Altern Med, PubMed
  4. Health Benefits of Lime Essential Oil by Organic Facts
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.

Lemon Essential Oil

Lemon Essential Oil – Possible Skin Issues:

lemon-new

Greener Life Diamond – Bio-Healthy Score => 3 Possible Skin Issues:

Maximum dermal use level: 2% to avoid phototoxicity

The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) recommends that Lemon oil be limited to 2% (about 10 drops per ounce of any other carrier oils) for leave-on products like ointments, creams, and lotions used on skin exposed to sunlight. There is no restriction for body washes, shampoos, soaps, and other wash-off products because the oil does not remain on the skin.

Learn more about the Greener Life Diamond and the benefits of the Greener Life Club

Lemon essential oil is among the photosensitizing citrus oils that may cause burning sensation, irritation, hyperpigmentation (discoloration of the skin surface) and other changes due to its effect of stimulating the photosensitivity of the skin, when exposed to visible light from the sun within 12 hours of use. The primary reason is the reaction of the photoactive chemical components that absorbs light and leads to toxicity via molecular alterations in the skin.

The chief chemical component accountable for the skin sensitizing and other dermal effects of Lemon oil is Limonene and few other furanocoumarins.

Buy Lemon Essential Oil – 4oz – CLICK HERE

Buy Lemon Essential Oil – 1KG – CLICK HERE

Certain studies (like the 1994 study on the ‘Occupation Contact Dermatitis from Citrus fruits’ and a 2006 study on ‘Skin Diseases in Workers at a Perfume factory’) on the adverse skin reactions of using the essential oil of Citrus limon reports few cases, including the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis with the use of Lemon rind oil in the workers of the perfume industry. Patch testing also witnessed certain allergic effects on using Lemon rind oil.

Research reveals that Lemon oil has furocoumarin derivatives like oxypeucedanin and bergapten; however the phototoxic effect of oxypeucedanin was just 1 quarter of that of bergapten. It is also stated that these components are the major cause of concern behind the phototoxicity of Lemon essential oil. This study also states that oxypeucedanin educes photo pigmentation on the skin of colored-guinea-pig prior to visible erythema.

It is also stated that the quantity of these 2 phototoxic components in Lemon oils from various countries differed by about a factor greater than 20 (bergapten, 4-87 ppm; oxypeucedanin, 26-728 ppm (parts per million), with a wavering ratio.

The safe dilution use level of Lemon oil, a potential phototoxic essential oil is 2%, which is about 12 drops per ounce of any carrier oils, according to the International Fragrance Association (IFRA). This applies only for products employed for dermal use to prevent phototoxicity and is not valid for wash-off items like shampoos, soaps and other bath products.

Lemon oil has ‘Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS)’authorization by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). As per the European decree, essential oils containing furanocoumarins can be used provided the aggregate level of bergapten does not exceed 15 ppm in cosmetic products that are ready-to-use on the skin, which is prone to be exposed to direct sunlight sans wash-away items and 1 ppm in bronzing and sunscreen products.

On a lighter note, Furocoumarins are also used in remedial practices along with long-wave ultraviolet light therapy for treating psoriasis, mycosis fungoides and vitiligo.

Lemon-broucher
Visit AyurvedicOils.com for more information on the traditional ayurvedic and aromatherapeutic uses of Lemon Oil. Learn about the natural chemical components that give Lemon Oil its fragrance and therapeutic characteristics.

Referred to as ‘Golden Apple’ in the Indian subcontinent, Lemon is a traditional remedy for many health disorders and is often called as a panacea for its ability to heal the mind and the body in manifold ways. The essential oil of Lemon is cold pressed from the external rind or peel of the Lemon fruits.

Known as Nimbuka, Jambira and Dantashata in Ayurveda, Lemon is a popular Ayurvedic remedy that is used in medicine, food and also in the process of purification. It is used for stimulating the nervous system, improve concentration power, enhance immunity, purify blood and support digestion.

Lemon and its essential oil is a popular ingredient of many Ayurvedic weight loss remedies and lemon juice taken with lukewarm water in empty stomach in the morning is said to reduce fat deposits and eliminate toxins from the body.

Reference Links Substantiating the Possible Skin Issues of Lemon Oil:

  1. A study of the phototoxicity of lemon oil by Naganuma M, Hirose S and Nakayama Y, Nakajima K and Someya T, published in the Archives of Dermatological Research and PubMed
  2. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals By Robert Tisserand, Rodney Young
  3. Leung’s Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients, used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics by Ikhlas A. Khan and Ehab A. Abourashed.
  4. Citrus limon, American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook, Second Edition by Zoe Gardner, Michael McGuffin
  5. Lemon oil side effects by WebMD
  6. Safety Information on Essential Oils by the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy

Thought for the day:

When fate hands you a lemon, make lemonade.

– Dale Carnegie

Suggested Reading:

  1. HEALING POWERS OF LEMON OIL (The Aromatherapy Professional: Healing with Essential Oils) by KG Stiles
  2. Lemon: 50 Plus Recipes for Skin Care, Hair Care, Home and Laundry Cleaning along with Lemonade, Vegan, Curd, Chicken, Cookies, Cakes and Desserts by Pamesh Y
  3. How to Use Lemon Essential Oil (Aromatherapy) by Miriam Kinai
  4. Ayurveda & Aromatherapy: The Earth Essential Guide to Ancient Wisdom and Modern Healing by Dr. Light Miller, Dr. Bryan Miller
  5. Essential Oil Safety, Second Edition by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

Reference Links:

  1. 35 Health Benefits of Lemon – Ayurveda Details by Dr JV Hebbar MD (Ayu) in Easy Ayurveda
  2. Lemon by Wikipedia
  3. Health Benefits of Lemon Essential Oil by Alternative Medicine, About.Com
  4. The Benefits of Lemon Oil on Skin by Livestrong.Com
Your resource for quality Essential Oils. Every batch is GC tested to ensure purity and authenticity.