Cumin Seed Oil

Cumin Seed Oil Possible Skin Issues:

cumin-seed-oil

Greener Life Diamond – Bio-Healthy Score => 3 Possible Skin Issues:

Maximum dermal use level: 0.4% to avoid phototoxicity

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The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) recommends that Cumin Seed oil be limited to 0.4% (about 2.4 drops per ounce of any other carrier oils) for leave-on products like ointments, creams, and lotions used on skin exposed to sunlight. There is no restriction for body washes, shampoos, soaps, and other wash-off products because the oil does not remain on the skin.

The essential oil of Cumin is said to have phototoxic effects, which may lead to allergic reactions, mild skin irritation, sunburn, blisters and hyperpigmentation when the skin is exposed to direct light from the sun with increased use of dermal application of Cumin oil (more than the safe level) for up to 12 hours after use. The major chemical constituents held responsible for the adverse skin effects of Cumin oil are Cuminaldehyde and certain other phenols.

According to the International Fragrance Association, the safe and maximum level of dermal use of Cumin oil is 0.4%. Photosensitivity and other associated skin defects are said to occur when the safe limit of Cumin oil is exceeded and is used on the parts of the skin that are exposed to visible sunshine. This is applicable only for leave-on products like creams, massage blends, ointments and lotions and not for rinse-off products like bath preparations.

Cumin oil has the status of Generally Recognized as Safe by the FDA. The Research Institute of Fragrance Materials (RIFM) reports about 5% No-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for phototoxic effects on volunteers for Cumin seed oil.

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Never use Cumin oil in an undiluted manner and ensure that you always blend essential oils with appropriate carrier oils as pure essential oils are highly concentrated and might cause adverse effects on the skin, eyes and the system.

The National Association For Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) cites Cumin oil as a photosensitizer and dermal irritant thus it is always recommended to use in a diluted form and should be avoided on damaged skin, eyes, allergic skin conditions and inflammatory parts.

Cumin seed oil is prescribed safe only for topical applications and not for internal use. Certain animal studies have concluded that overdose of Cumin seeds proved anti-fertility activity. Cumin seeds, due to their emmenagogue properties were proved to exhibit mild abortifacient activity, when tested on rats with the gestational age of 8 to 12 days with aqueous cumin extracts.

These seeds were proved to cause anaphylactic reactions on overdose. Caution should be taken in using Cumin oil, if you have a history of irritation or inflammation of the kidneys. It is also said that Cumin seeds may also cause low blood sugar so it is best to avoid the use of Cumin oil prior to 2 weeks before and after any surgical conditions.

Avoid Cumin oil if you are pregnant or getting ready to conceive as Cumin oil has abortifacient and anti-fertility effects, when used more than the prescribed level can end up in miscarriage, stimulate menstruation or premature labor and might delay the chances of getting pregnant.

Reference Links Substantiating the Possible Skin Issues of Cumin Oil:

  1. Cumin, American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook, Second Edition by Zoe Gardner, Michael McGuffin
  2. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals By Robert Tisserand, Rodney Young
  3. Cumin by Drugs.com
  4. Cumin side effects and safety by WebMD
  5. Safety Information on Essential Oils by the National Association For Holistic Aromatherapy

Thought for the day:

Joy in looking and comprehending is nature’s most beautiful gift. -Albert Einstein

Suggested Reading:

  1. Ayurveda & Aromatherapy: The Earth Essential Guide to Ancient Wisdom and Modern Healing by Dr. Light Miller, Dr. Bryan Miller
  2. Fragrance & Wellbeing: Plant Aromatics and Their Influence on the Psyche by Jennifer Peace Rhind
  3. Cumin & Coriander: A celebration of everyday North Indian cooking by Archana Nirad
  4. Cumin (Cuminum cyminum): Production and Processing from Science Publishers
  5. Curry Leaves and Cumin Seeds: A Healthier Approach to Indian Cooking by Jeeta Gandhi
  6. Essential Oil Safety, Second Edition by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

Reference Links:

  1. Cumin by Wikipedia
  2. Cumin from Ayurveda and Aromatherapy by Light Miller and Bryan Miller
  3. Cumin (Cuminum Cyminum) as a potential source of antioxidants by Muhammad Nadeem and Asad Riaz from the National Institute of Food Science and Technology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
  4. A 2011 study on Cuminum Cyminum and Carum Carvi by R.K.Johri as published in PubMed.
  5. A 2009 article on Delay of diabetic cataract in rats by the antiglycating potential of Cumin through modulation of alpha-crystallin chaperone activity.

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