Clary Sage Essential Oil

Clary Sage Oil – Possible Skin Issues:

Greener Life Diamond – Bio-Healthy Score => 3 – Possible Skin Issues:

Maximum dermal use level: 0.25%

Tisserand and Young recommend that Clary Sage oil be limited to 0.25% (about 1.5 drops per ounce of any other carrier oils) for leave-on products like ointments, creams, and lotions. There is no restriction for body washes, shampoos, soaps, and other wash-off products because the oil does not remain on the skin.

The essential of oil of Clary Sage is considered non-toxic and exhibits mild skin irritation. Few studies have witnessed the moderate irritating effect of Clary Sage oil on rabbit skin. With a regulatory status of ‘Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS)’authorized by the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration), Clary Sage oil is safe on skin when blended with appropriate carrier oils.

The safe level of dilution for Clary Sage oil is 0.25 % according to Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young in their book, Essential Oil Safety. In rodent studies, it has been shown that Clary Sage oil has the effect of causing motor (cognitive function) impairment and sedation, thus the excess use of this oil might result in dizziness, headache and lowering the level of concentration (especially during the use in Aromatherapy massage).

For this reason, it is recommended to avoid the use of Clary Sage oil while you’re taking alcohol or any other narcotic drugs. This oil also has the ability to potentially influence the Limbic system, especially the pituitary gland and thalamus.

Clary Sage is also said to contain hypotensive (decreasing blood pressure) properties and is advised to avoid the use of this oil if you have low blood pressure.

The most popular attribute of Clary sage oil is its estrogenic effect and is not an estrogen mimic. The presence of the sclareol, which has an estrogen-like structure is responsible for this effect and supports in the treatment of menstrual conditions. It binds with estrogen receptor sites, blocking the activity of the system’s own estrogens, ending up in the lessening of estrogenic action.

The use of Clary Sage oil, especially during the early stages of pregnancy is highly discouraged, as it may cause uterine contractions and stimulate menstrual flow. Clary Sage oil is also used by nursing mothers to stop lactation, so do not use Clary Sage oil if you are breastfeeding as it has an anti-galactogogue property.

Never ingest essential oils and remember to dilute in suitable carrier oils before dermal application, as pure essential oils are highly concentrated liquids and might cause adverse effects in your system. This pertains only for products engaged in topical use and is not valid for wash-off products like soaps, shampoos and other bathing varieties.

Reference Links Substantiating the Possible Skin Issues of Clary Sage Oil:

  1. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals By Robert Tisserand, Rodney Young
  2. Leung’s Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients, used in Food, Drugs and Cosmetics by Ikhlas A. Khan and Ehab A. Abourashed.
  3. American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook, Second Edition by Zoe Gardner, Michael McGuffin
  4. Is Clary Sage oil Estrogenic? by Robert Tisserand
  5. Clary Sage oil by Mercola.com
  6. Randomized controlled trial for Salvia sclarea or Lavandula angustifolia: differential effects on blood pressure in female patients with urinary incontinence undergoing urodynamic examination by the Department of Nursing Science, Korea University published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
  7. The role of essential oils in the treatment and management of Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder by Heather Godfrey, published in the International Journal of Aromatherapy

Thought for the day:

Hope is the only bee that makes honey without flowers. -Robert Green Ingersoll

Suggested Reading:

  1. Clary Sage Essential Oil (Aromatherapy) by Miriam Kinai
  2. Mind Body Soul Aromatherapy by Rosa C Murphy M.Ed.
  3. How to Use Clary Sage Essential Oil (Aromatherapy) by Miriam Kinai
  4. Aromatherapy and Massage for Mother and Baby by Allison England R.N.
  5. Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit: Restoring Emotional and Mental Balance with Essential Oils by Gabriel Mojay
  6. Essential Oil Safety, Second Edition by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

Reference Links:

  1. Salvia sclarea by Wikipedia
  2. Clary Sage: Peaceful Rejuvenation by Vedic Society
  3. Ayurveda and Aromatherapy by Light Miller and Bryan Miller
  4. 38+ Benefits and Uses for Clary Sage Oil by Sustainable Baby Steps
  5. Randomized Controlled Trial for Salvia sclarea or Lavandula angustifolia: Differential Effects on Blood Pressure in Female Patients with Urinary Incontinence Undergoing Urodynamic Examination submitted to the Department of Basic Nursing Science, Korea University, published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine

Save