Category Archives: Essential Oil Botanicals

Spice Bush


Spice Bush


Latin Name: lindera benzoin
Alternative Name: spice-bush, wild allspice, spicewood, feverwood, fever-bush, benjamin bush
Forms Available: essential oil, twig, bark, berry

Spice Bush – lindera benzoin – An aromatic plant. The dried powdered fruit is an “allspice” substitute. The bark isused to treat coughs and colds. Infusions or decoctions have, in the past, been used to treat fevers such as typhoid. The oil from the berries can be applied, externally in a poultice, to treat bruises, skin conditions, rheumatism…

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: The bark is used to treat coughs and colds and has been used, in the past, to treat fevers such as typhoid.


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Spiderwort


Spiderwort


Latin Name: tradescantia sp., tradescantia virginiana
Alternative Name: virginia spiderwort
Forms Available: leaf, flower

Spiderwort – tradescantia sp. – Used by Native American Indians to treat cancer. The roots and leaves, mashed or in a poultice, can be applied externally to insect stings and bites. The roots have laxative properties. They have also been used, in a tea, to treat stomachaches, female issues and kidney complaints.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: The root can be used in a tea to treat stomachaches, as a laxative, and to relieve female issues. Applied, externally in a poultice, to treat insect bites and stings.


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Spikenard


spikenard


Latin Name: nardostachys jatamansi
Alternative Name: indian root, american sarsaparilla
Forms Available: essential oil

Spikenard – nardostachys jatamansi – Aroma is leathery, earthy and fungal, but sweet and is a reddish brown or amber-colored oil Spikenard is widely mentioned in the bible. It is a very calming oil, both emotionally and physically, and is of special value in serious skin conditions. Powerful antifungal. Indicated for psoriasis, athlete’s foot, fungal infections, dandruff and emotionally for deep sadness. It’s a powerful oil for grounding, for emotional needs. Spikenard is known in aromatherapy circles as “a woman’s oil” and is recommended for use in spiritual blends or blends for meditation.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: It is a very calming oil, both emotionally and physically, and is of special value in serious skin conditions. Powerful antifungal. Indicated for psoriasis, athlete’s foot, fungal infections, dandruff and emotionally for deep sadness.


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Spruce


spruce


Latin Name: tsuga canadense

Forms Available: essential oil

Spruce – tsuga canadensi – Fresh pine, bitter orange peel aroma. Recommended for relief of stress and anxiety. Also recommended for muscle aches and pains, aching joints, poor circulation, muscle spasms. Inhaled for the respiratory system, helpful for bronchitis or asthma. Blends well with Orange, Lavender and Clary sage.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Recommended for relief of stress and anxiety. Also recommended for muscle aches and pains, aching joints, poor circulation, muscle spasms. Inhaled for the respiratory system, helpful for bronchitis or asthma.


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St. John’s Wort

St. John’s Wort

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Latin Name: hypericum perforatum
Alternative Name: amber, fuga daemonum -latin for scare-devil, goat weed, Hhrba John, John’s wort, kamath weed, sol terrestis, tipton weed
Forms Available: flower, leaf, stem

St. John’s Wort – hypericum perforatum – A Druid sacred herb, the Celts passed it through the smoke of the Summer Solstice fire, then wore it in battle for invincibility. This herb has woody-based stems, with pairs of small, balsamic-scented leaves and clusters of lemon-scented, yellow summer flowers. The leaves are used in salads and to flavor liqueurs. Extract of the flowering tops is antiviral, astringent, and sedative; it treats inflammation, wounds, and diarrhea. Taken internally, it calms nerves and treats depression. It is under research for AIDS treatment. The flowers yield yellow and red dyes.
The herb is the part used for lung problems, bladder complaints, diarrhea, dysentery, depression, hemorrhages, and jaundice. Steep two teaspoons of the herb per cup of water for twenty minutes. Take one-half cup in the morning and one-half cup at bed time. Bedwetting is helped by a nightly cup of the tea. The oil and fomentation are applied externally the injuries, especially when nerve endings are involved, i.e. fingers and toes, and to soften tumors and caked breasts.
To make the oil, cover the flowers with good cold-pressed olive oil and leave the sealed preparation in the hot sun for twenty-one days or until it becomes a rich red. The oil is excellent for massages, as it affects the spine directly. Varicose veins, mild burns, inflammations, neuralgia, and rheumatism are helped by a poultice of it.
CAUTION: Malignant tumors must be treated with care. Never rub or massage a malignant growth, as cells may become detached and travel to other parts of the body.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Extract of the flowering tops is antiviral, astringent, and sedative; it treats inflammation, wounds, and diarrhea. Taken internally, it calms nerves and treats depression.

Other Uses: The Welsh called this plant “leaf of the blessed.” It was understood to be an idea combination of water and fire, the ultimate healing essence


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Star Anise


Star Anise


Latin Name: Illicium verum
Alternative Name: chinese anise
Forms Available: seed

Star Anise – illicium verum – All parts of this small, evergreen tree are aromatic; the smooth, gray-white bark, narrow to elliptic shiney green leaves; solitary yellow flowers; and glossy brown seeds. The distinctive seeds and pods are used as a spice in Asian cookery, notably as an ingredient of Chinese five-spice powder. The fruits and foliage yield an essential oil, used as a substitute anise seed flavoring, or, medicinally to relieve chest complaints, rheumatism, and flatulence. The oil appears in soaps, hair oils, and Asian perfumes.
Chew the seeds after a meal to help the digestion. Simmer the seeds to make a tea for colic and rheumatic complaints. Steep one teaspoon of the crushed seed in one cup of boiled water for twenty minutes and take up to two cups a day. Often added to other brews to improve taste, the tea of the seed will help cramps and nausea, promote menstruation, and increase breast milk. It also relieves insomnia. The seeds are simmered into salves for scabies and lice. The oil is a stomach tonic. The seeds can be tinctured in brandy -rather than the usual vodka, whiskey, or grain alcohol- with some lemon peel; the dose is one-fourth to one-half teaspoon.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: The tea of the seed will help cramps and nausea, promote menstruation, and increase breast milk. It also relieves insomnia. The seeds are simmered into salves for scabies and lice. The oil is a stomach tonic.

Other Uses: The powdered bark is used as an incense in Japanese temples. The tree is planted by the Japanese around temples and on graves as an herb of consecration and protection. The seeds are burned as incense to increase psychic powers.


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Stevia


Stevia


Latin Name: stevia rebaudiana

Forms Available: ground

Stevia – stevia rebaudiana – An herb used as a replacement for sugar or other non-nutritive sweeteners. The resulting extract from the stevia plant is roughly ten times sweeter than sugar. With Stevia, you must experiment until you get it right, some persons find it way too sweet. Dark green in color. Sugar amount: 1 cup = 1 teaspoon Stevia powder Sugar amount: 1 tablespoon = 1/4 teaspooon Sugar amount: 1 teaspoon = a pinch of Stevia powder Some users feel more comfortable turning the powder into a liquid and this can be done by diluting the powder in distilled water and then storing in the refrigerator for a few days: Sugar amount: 1 tablespoon = 6-9 drops Sugar amount: 1 teaspoon = 2-4 drops


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Strawberry, Wild


Strawberry, Wild


Latin Name: fragaria virginiana
Alternative Name: scarlet strawberry, virginia strawberry
Forms Available: root, leaf, fruit, tea

Wild Strawberry – fragaria virginiana – the fruit is very fragrant and tastes delicious, it is eaten raw, cooked or in preserves. The leaves make an herbal tea which has also been used as a tonic for the nerves. A tea from the root is diuretic and has been used to treat irregular menstruation, stomach problems, lung problems, and diarrhea. The fruit has been used as a substitute toothpaste, the juice dissolving the tartar on the tooth.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: The leaves make an herbal tea which has also been used as a tonic for the nerves. A tea from the root is diuretic and has been used to treat irregular menstruation, stomach problems, lung problems, and diarrhea.


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Sumachs


Sumachs


Latin Name: rhus sp. rhus copallina, rhus glabra
Alternative Name: smooth sumac, upland sumach, dwarf sumac, sumac
Forms Available: bark, berry, leaf, root

Sumachs – rhus sp. – dwarf sumac: rhus copallina and smooth sumac: rhus glabra. Dwarf sumac: the root has been used to treat dysentery. Externally, a poultice of the root, treats skin sores and wounds. A tea from the bark stimulates lactation. Smooth sumac: The berries have been used, internally, to reduce fevers and treat bowel problems.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Dwarf sumac – stimulates lactation, treats dysentery. Smooth sumac – berries reduce fevers and are diuretic, Externally used as an antiseptic.


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Sunflower


Sunflower


Latin Name: helianthus annuus
Alternative Name: corona solis, marigold of peru, solo indianus, chrysanthemum peruvianum
Forms Available: oil, flower, leaf, stalk, root , seed

Sunflower – helianthus annuus – This fast-growing annual has a thick, tall, hairy stem, heart-shaped leaves, and large yellow flower heads in late summer. The nutritious seeds are eaten raw, roasted, and ground into meal or nut butter and were used by Native American warriors as “energy cakes.” The flower buds give a yellow dye and are cooked like artichokes. The pressed seeds yield an all-purpose oil with culinary, cosmetic, and industrial uses. Medicinally, the seeds are used as a diuretic and expectorant and treat coughs, dysentery, and kidney inflammation. The root is a laxative and treats stomach pain. The stem pith yields potash and fibers for textiles and paper, and its cellular lightness is used for microscope slide mounts. The seed heads provide food for birds in winter.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Medicinally, the seeds are used as a diuretic and expectorant and treat coughs, dysentery, and kidney inflammation. The root is a laxative and treats stomach pan.

Other Uses: In Aztec temples of the sun, priestesses carried sunflowers and wore them as crowns. As sun sumbols, these flowers symbolize the healthy ego, the wisdom, and the fertility of the solar logos. Sunflower seeds are eaten by women who wish to concieve.


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