Meadowsweet

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Meadowsweet


Latin Name: filipendula ulnaria
Alternative Name: queen of the meadow, gravel root, meadowwort, bride of the meadow, bridewort, dollof, meadwort, gravel root, little queen, steeplebush, trumpet weed.
Forms Available: leaf, root, flower

Meadowsweet – filipendula ulnaria – Also known as Queen of the Meadow, Gravel Root, and Meadowwort. One of the three most sacred Druid herbs, the others being Mint and Vervain, this herb has upright stems of wintergreen-scented, divided leaves, topped by frothy umbels of almond-scented cream flowers. The stems grow up to four feet tall and are sometimes purple. The leaves smell like almonds and the flowers give an almond flavor to mead, herb wines, jam and stewed fruit. Dried flowers scent linen and yield an astringent skin tonic. Flower buds contain salicylic aced, a chemical from which aspirin was synthesized, not from Filipendula but from Spirea, a related herb, but the herb as a whole is gentler on the stomach. Herbalists use flower tea for stomach ulcers and headaches, as an antiseptic diuretic, and for feverish colds, diarrhea, and heartburn. Meadowsweet was a favorite strewing herb of Elizabeth I.
Traditional herbalists simmered the flowers in wine to treat fevers and to cure depression. The fresh flower tops, taken in tea, promote sweating. Steep two teaspoons of the herb in one cup boiled water for twenty minutes. Take one-quarter cup four times a day. A distilled water of the flowers makes an eyewash to treat burning and itching. Meadowsweet is a classic for diarrhea, especially valued for children. The leaf is added to wine to bring a “merry heart”, that is, to treat depression. Meadowsweet contains methyl salicylate, making it a good herb for rheumatic compaints and flus. It is astringent and helps with indigestion. It has diuretic properties, which make it helpful in edema. The tea hads been used for respiratory tract infections, gout, and arthritis. It can help bladder and kidney problems, epilepsy, and rabies.
The whole plant is used – roots, flowers, and leaves – with the root being more useful for fevers. To prepare the root, simmer two tablespoons of the dried root in one cup of water for twenty minutes. Take one cup a day. The leaf is placed in claret wine to enhance the tast, and it was at one time added to mead.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Herbalists use flower tea for stomach ulcers and headaches, as an antiseptic diuretic, and for feverish colds, diarrhea, and heartburn. Meadowsweet contains methyl salicylate, making it a good herb for rheumatic compaints and flus. It is an astringent.

Other Uses: According to Grieve, meadowsweet, water mint, and vervain were the three most sacred herbs of the Druids. Fresh flowers should be included in the bridal bouquet. Use for: Love; Happiness; Divination; Peace.


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