Mexican Tea


Mexican Tea


Latin Name: chenopodium ambrosioides
Alternative Name: wormseed, american wormseed, jerusalem oak, stinking weed, feather geranium, goosefoot
Forms Available: essential oil, seed

Mexican Tea – chenopodium ambrosioides – This plant was used by Native American Indians to cure their children of round worms and hook worms. It has been a much used herb but is no longer recommended due to severe side effects – it has been known to cause death.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Has been cure for round worm and hook worm, no longer considered safe


[Purchase Mexican Tea Based Products]

[Essential Depot]




Milk Thistle


Milk Thistle


Latin Name: silybum marianum
Alternative Name: silybum, silymarin, mary’s thistle
Forms Available: seed, flower

Milk Thistle – silybum marianum – an annual or biennial plant. Grows to 2-3 foot with prickly leaves and milky sap. This herb is mostly used in the form of a concentrated botanical capsule or by injection as it is not soluable in water. This herb is a liver tonic – it protects the liver and it’s functions, helping it renew cells. It can be used to treat hepatitis, jaundice, cirrhosis, alcohol poisoning and even aid the protection of the liver during chemotherapy.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: A liver tonic – renews the cells. Treats hepatitis, jaundice, cirrhosis, alcohol damage.


[Purchase Milk Thistle Based Products]

[Essential Depot]




Mint


Mint


Latin Name: mentha spicata, sativa, aquatica, and others
Alternative Name: garden mint, mackerel mint, brandy mint, and many others.
Forms Available: above ground portions of the herb

Mint – mentha spicata, sativa, aquatica, and others – A Druid sacred herb, most mints are creeping plants that hybridize easily, producing infinite variations. The have erect, square branching stems, aromatic foliage and flowers in leaf axils. Mints are stimulant, aid digestion, and reduce flatulence. They flavor candy, drinks, cigarettes, toothpastes, and medicines.
The infuseion of the herb has been used for diarrhea and as an emmenagogue -it brings down the menses. It is a classic for colds and influenza, especially when mixed with elder flower-but be careful, as this remedy will make you sweat, and you must take care to keep well covered with blankets and woolens. Stomach flu is helped by a mint, elderflower, and yarrow combination in a standard infusion of two teaspoons per cup steeped for twenty minutes and taken in quarter-cup doses.
Mint is helpful in stomach complaints, but a strong infusion will be emetic -it makes one throw up. Mint tea eases colic and eases depression. It relieves earaches when the fresh juice of a few drops of the essential oil are placed in the ear. A few drops of the oil in water, applied with a cloth, help burning and itching, heat prostration, and sunburn. Apply it directly to an itchy skin condition or sunburn. For heat prostration place the cool fomentation on the forehead and wrists.
Mint tea with honey soothes a sore throat. A classic cold remedy that will unblock the sinuses is two drops of mint essential oil, two drop eucalyptus essential oil and the juice of half a lemon in a cup of hot water. The mix is first inhaled and then drunk when warm. CAUTION: No more than two drops of the essential oils should be taken at any time, and no more that two cups a day of the above mixture. Larger doses can be toxic to the kidneys.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Peppermint – Acne; Dermatitis; Ringworm; Scabies; Toothache; Neuralgia; Muscular Pain; Palpitations; Asthma. Key Qualities: Refreshing; Restorative; Nerve Tonic; Cephalic; Aphrodisiac; Mental Stimulant.

Other Uses: Mint is placed in the home as a protective herb. It belongs to the sphere of Venus and has long been used in healing potions and mixtures.Use for: Protection; Healing; Prosperity; Good Luck; Fortune; Justice; Travel; Exorcism.


[Purchase Mint Based Products]

[Essential Depot]



Mistletoe


Mistletoe


Latin Name: viscum album – European Mistletoe. phoradendron flavenscens – American Mistletoe
Alternative Name: birdlime, all-heal, druid’s herb, golden bough, holy wood, misseltoe, thunderbesem, witches broom, wood of the cross, devil’s fuge, donnerbesen, herbe de la croi, mystyldyne, lignum crucis, korean mistletoe
Forms Available: leaf, twig

Mistletoe – viscum album – Also known as Birdlime, All-Heal, Druid’s Herb, and Golden Bough. It is the most sacred “tree” of the Druids and rules over Winter Solstice. The berries are poisonous. Mistletoe is thought to be most powerful if growing on an oak tree. The leafy twigs, toxic in volume, are a heart tonic, reduce blood pressure, slow heart rate, strengthen capillary walls, stimulate the immune system and inhibit tumors.
Mistletoe grows from northern Europe to northwest Africa and east to Asia and Japan. Different varieties are found on hard-wood and softwood trees, which include apple, elm, oak, spruce, pine, and poplar. Druids considered that the mistletoe found on oak was the most potent and sacred. The berries ripen in midwinter and have a further peculiarity in that the ripe berries, open flowers, green berries, and immature leaves can all be found on the same plant. Mistletoe does not adhere to the linear logic of most plants, with their budding, flowering, and seed production sequence. It also seems to ignore heilotropism and geotropism, it will grow upside down, sideways, or in any direction it “chooses”. Another unique feature is that it germinates only in the light, unlike most plants, which require darkness to germinate. The flower buds form in May but do not open until February. The berries ripen the following winter. The entire process, from flower to fruit, can take almost two years!
Mistletoe is a semi-parasitic plant, generally spread by bird droppings. It forms a globular mass that can reach up to three feet in diameter. There are male plants and female plants, and both derive thair water and minerals from the host tree and produce their own carbohydrates via photosynthesis.
Mistletoe seems to hold itself aloof form the rhythms and laws of the earthly seasone, and in this way parrallels the illogical and uncontrolled growth of cancerous cells in the body. As early as 1961, laboratory studies demonstrated that mistletoe, along with other immunostimulant plants such as -eupatorium, astragalus, echinacea, acathopanax, chamomilla, and sabal- inhibited tumors in mice. Fermented mistletoe taken from oak trees was shown to stimulate the activity of killer cells and showed an especially stron effect on rat hepatomas -liver cancers. Unfermented mistletoe showed a strong effect on human leukemia -Molt 4- cells. Korean mistletoe -Viscum coloratum- was found to be more active in inhibiting the growth of leukemia L1210, especially when used fresh.
Mistletoe extracts have been shown to possess significant antitumor activity, not only against murine tumore but also in cases of Lewis’ lung carcinome, a colon adenocarcinoma 38 and C3H adenocarcinomas of the breast. The extracts are not toxic and may be administered in high doses. Twenty drops four times a day is the average dose.
Many nervous conditions such as convulsions, delirium, hysteria, neuralgia, urinary disorders, and heart conditions have benefitted from the activity of mistletoe. It has also been used to temper the spasms of epilepsy. Mistletoe strengthens the heart and has been used as a heart tonic in cases of typhoid fever. It strengthens the glandular system and has helped with inflammation of the pancreas. It promotes hormonal balance when taken daily for six months.
Mistletoe is recommended for use after a stroke or when hardening of the arteries is suspected. It will stop pulmonary and intestinal bleeding caused by dysentary and typhoid. It helps to lower high blood pressure and raise low blood pressure, and it has been used to ease heavy menstrual flow, heart palpitations, hot flashes, and the anxiety associated with menopause. The fresh juice has been said to increase fertility in barren women.
The green plant can be simmered using a standard concoction of two teaspoons of the herb per cup of water and taken in tablespoon doses several times a day.
CAUTION: Large doses have been known to induce convulsions in children. The berries should not be used for internal consumption. They are used in salves and washes for wounds.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: The leafy twigs, toxic in volume, are a heart tonic, reduce blood pressure, slow heart rate, strengthen capillary walls, stimulate the immune system and inhibit tumors.

Other Uses: Kiss your love beneath mistletoe and you’ll stay in love. Burned, Mistletoe banishes evil. Its wood is a good choice for wands and ritual inplements. Mistletoe is an excelllent all-purpose herb. Spell Use: Protection; Love; Hunting; Fertility; Health.


[Purchase Mistletoe Based Products]

[Essential Depot]




Morning Glory


Morning Glory


Latin Name: ipomoea purpurea
Alternative Name: ipomoea, vona-nox
Forms Available: seed

Morning Glory – ipomoea purpurea – a climbing plant. This herb has been used to treat mental disorders. It is somewhat hallucinogenic and has laxative and diuretic properties. It is also anthelmintic – aids the expulsion of worms

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: diuretic, hallucinogenic, laxative, anthelmintic.


[Purchase Morning Glory Based Products]

[Essential Depot]




Motherwort


Motherwort


Latin Name: leonurus cardiaca
Alternative Name: lion’s tail, heartwort
Forms Available: cut

Motherwort – leonurus cardiaca – Ancient Greeks and Romans used motherwort for both physical and emotion problems of the heart–palpitations and depression. In ancient China it was reputed to promote longevity. Contemporary herbalists recommend motherwort as a tranquilizer and for heart palpitations and delayed or suppressed menstruation. Takes the edge off PMS. Useful in menopausal changes. Some research suggests that Motherwort contains chemicals that may reduce blood pressure. Even though considered a tranquilizer, Motherwort contains a chemical, leonurine, that encourages uterine contractions, lending support to its traditional use in childbirth and menstruation promotion. Motherwort tastes very bitter, add sugar or honey and lemon to improve flavor. Should not be given to children under age 2. Persons with clotting disorders should avoid it. Pregnant and nursing mothers should not use this herb. To make an infusion, pour a cup of boiling water onto l-2 teaspoonfuls of the dried herb and leave to infuse for l0-l5 minutes. This should be drunk three times a day.


[Purchase Motherwort Based Products]

[Essential Depot]



Mountain Laurel


Mountain Laurel


Latin Name: kalmia latifolia

Forms Available: leaf

mountain laurel – kalmia latifolia – This is a VERY poisonous plant. Some Native American Indian tribes used it to commit suicide. It is used in some homeopathic remedies but not many. The leaves slow bleeding, ease pain, disinfect, and are narcotic. This herb should only be used under direction of a qualified administrator.

Aromatherapy & Health Uses: Used by homepathic doctors in remedies for fibromyalgia, shingles, osteoarthritis, rheumatioid arthritis, eye strain and bursitis


[Purchase Mountain Laurel Based Products]

[Essential Depot]